Neuropeptides and Benefits of Crying for Emotional Detox

neuropeptides-benefits-of-crying

Written by Phi, a member of the Parallel Perception Forum.

I can contribute my favorite info about neuropeptides. They are a key component in the chemistry that bonds neural pathways into avenues of thought and emotional cascade.

When a neural pathway has bonded (with peptides), anytime it is triggered the individual will experience strong gravity to go down that same path of thought and emotions will cascade along the sequence of wounding imprinted along that path.

When we cry with a full sense of vulnerability and willingness to let go, surrender and grieve our tears are filled with neuropeptides.

This is one of the fastest and strongest ways for the body to physically remove peptide bonds from neural pathways, so that a new pathway can form.

Through grieving, the body is pushing those peptides outside, through the tears and it is an emotional detox.

The research on these tears shows also that when we cry in a state of resistance to letting go, crying the victim and resisting not getting what we want, our eyes swell up and become red and the tears irritate the skin more. We may get a headache or feel worse and exhausted after crying.

When we cry with surrender to the vulnerable raw suffering of our pain while we willingly let go and grieve, there is a higher component of peptides in the tears. The eyes become less swollen and the crying leaves us feeling refreshed, cleansed and our face is clearer.

We are then open to a new way of perceiving particularly on the topic that we have to let go of. This is the seed moment of when we form a new neural pathway.

I love crying like this, even though it is often triggered by suffering and confrontation of the loss of an idea or dream, it is an alchemical moment of transformation and i marvel at how awesome our bodies are and how transformative our vulnerability is.

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6 Comments
  1. Hey Phi,

    Very interesting, I have heard of this before. It suggests that crying is not just relieving, but that it is also “useful”, in terms of letting and moving on. Where did you get the info from? Have you got any links?
    Cheers

    • Dear Phi,

      I have just read your post on crying. Wonderful. I love how neuroscience validates what we should and do know when we are connected to our deeper body awareness and feelings anyway.
      The bit about the different kind of crying! Now I have a neuroscience explanation of why some tears feel connecting and evoke empathy and some don’t.

      I,love your posts,Phi, thank you for your spirit and open heartedness.

      Angelika

  2. thankyou angelika.

  3. Phi, Ed, Angelika,

    I’m a bit late in joining this conversatioan, but as a woman and a holistic childcare provider ‘crying’ is very interesting to me. I recently read from a child psychologist (Patty Wipfler, Hand in Hand Parenting) that toxic chemicals are released when children are in stress, and the accompanying tears literally wash away these stress hormones. Crying in the presence of a caring adult allows children to feel safe and loved and connected, and for all parts of the brain to work together. Connection helps a child build intelligence and it helps him use the intelligence he already has. Nature is amazing. The evolution of our physical/emotional/mental/spiritual selves is amazing.

    For further study, I recommend Louann Brizendine’s The Female Brain. She explains all the different ‘cycles’ of a female life, beginning at concepton! She explains how women’s intuition and emotional sensitivity evolved, (women cry four times more often than men), how women respond differently to sound, and other sensations. It is wonderfully enlightening information for women about women, or for anyone that has a mom, a wife, a sister, or a daughter! lol!

  4. Phi, Ed, Angelika,

    I’m a bit late in joining this conversatioan, but as a woman and a holistic childcare provider ‘crying’ is very interesting to me. I recently read from a child psychologist (Patty Wipfler, Hand in Hand Parenting) that toxic chemicals are released when children are in stress, and the accompanying tears literally wash away these stress hormones. Crying in the presence of a caring adult allows children to feel safe and loved and connected, and for all parts of the brain to work together. Connection helps a child build intelligence and it helps him use the intelligence he already has. Nature is amazing. The evolution of our physical/emotional/mental/spiritual selves is amazing.

    For further study, I recommend Louann Brizendine’s The Female Brain. She explains all the different ‘cycles’ of a female life, beginning at concepton! She explains how women’s intuition and emotional sensitivity evolved, (women cry four times more often than men), how women respond differently to sound, and other sensations. It is wonderfully enlightening information for women about women, or for anyone that has a mom, a wife, a sister, or a daughter! lol!

  5. Society’s socialization of male and female roles has so much impact on how our brains develop over time, and thus how neuropeptides and neurobiology respond. Part of me hurts when women and men’s hearts are separated, as if the pain or joy either gender feels is somehow any different simply because of their gender. Do women cry more often than men because of gender, or is it because men do not feel as free to cry since that’s never been socially modeled?

    Epigenetics (the effect of environmental factors on our DNA) is throwing up all sorts of interesting new findings. Since the 1940’s, women are four times more likely to develop autoimmune diseases such as MS that statistically cannot be accounted for other than environmentally. Most women also bombard their bodies with probably four times more chemicals than men.

    When I look at a group of male or female heart warriors, although different gender wise, their strengths belong to each individually, beyond gender. Their intuition, compassion and emotional intelligence belong to their unique song as individuals. What a sight to behold. Within each a golden orb that is neither male nor female, just pure light.

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